About your Search

20130117
20130125
STATION
MSNBCW 53
LANGUAGE
English 53
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 53 (some duplicates have been removed)
of beyond the benghazi incident. i think there's been a dearth of discussion around foreign policy, and in some part that's due because the republicans themselves don't have -- have not verbalized or outlined a foreign policy agenda that's measurably different from that which the president is pursuing. i want to draw your attention to an article in the boston globe, an op ed that says basically the idea of a foreign policy doctrine is outmoded. grand strategies are overrated. they are no more likely to guide this nation to noble he was than painful ones. intervention is fervor, no matter the reason, tends to reflect not reality, but advocacy by people with agendas. one of the issues right now is that the president faces a number of shifting puzzle pieces around the globe. does that, in effect, mean that there cannot be an obama doctrine that applies globally? >> i think it's always helpful for a president and an administration to have a foreign policy and a philosophy about how to approach foreign policy, but you are right that even the greatest enunciation of strategy can be impac
relationships on behalf of the president's and the furtherance of american foreign policy. i'll have some questions later on policies and your views, including how you explain to world leaders how you could have been rooting for the boston red sox instead of what the world knows as the new york yankees as the team of the world, but lets me say, mr. chairman, it's been a pleasure working with you and looking forward to continuing to work with you on the issues you have championed over the years. fighting global terrorism, preventing the spread of nuclear pilogical and chemical weapons. fighting for human rights and against hiv/aids around the world. fighting crime, corruption, drug trafficking and stabding up as you always have for the interest of the foreign service around the world. in your new role, should you be confirmed and i know you will, you will be center stage, representing the interests of all of us, from securing our embassies and protecting our overseas personnel to promoting commerce and enhancing cross cultural ties and keeping america secure through cooperation where possi
. chris cillizza, the foreign policy, in many regards, has been run out of the white house, and perhaps even more so because mcdonagh, the deputy of national security director is going to be the next chief of staff. >> right. no reason to think that will change. andrea, look, we don't focus enough on foreign policy, but the challenges, we focus on the domestic challenges for barack obama, and as we talked about, his inaugural speech was very domestically focused. look, we just had elections in israel, john kerry not in the same place benjamin netanyahu is regarding a two-state solution, at least right now. there are huge challenges, iran, there are huge challenges in the foreign policy front that don't get talked about as much, but are clearly things that not only will be difficult for the president and his team to navigate, but will also have a significant say in how this president is viewed by history. >> and, by the way, we just got word that the white house is going to proceed with a nomination of general allen to be the nato supreme allied commander now that he's been cleared by th
surprising and perhaps not surprising many the speech in the last block, but i thought this foreign policy piece was one of the more surprising things he mentioned. insofar as it sounded like obama 1.0, the obama that was elected in 2008, who has since expanded the use of drones and extra judicial killings, who has had a very aggressive national security policy in place. i wondered what that meant, especially against the back drop of what is happening in the middle east, in syria, and algeria, and mali. what was your read on it? >> but has also, to be fair to president obama, ended the iraq war and begun the drive out of the afghanistan war. one of the really interesting things about the second term, we talked in the first segment about all of the issues of medicare and social security. anything there has to go through a republican house. >> right. >> creating obama's foreign policy does not, for the most part, and we can argue about congressional authority, but presidents have wide latitude on foreign policy, and his appointments on the foreign policy side in chuck hagel and to some lesse
was unfolding. >> right. well, there is the actual foreign policy piece, then there's the partisan ranker. maggie, before this began, we were looking at hillary clinton's approval ratings. 67% favorable, 26% unfavorable, 6% no opinion. we don't know if she's running for office in 2016, right? but certainly, some of this criticism, some of this questioning, is perhaps directing at poking some holes in the clintonian armor, if you will. >> perhaps. i would go there. no, i think that's absolutely right. i think the issue about benghazi, when it initially began, was a way at getting at obama through hillary clinton, right, during the campaign, but it then evolved into something else that was about her for exactly that purpose. if the idea today was to ding her up memorably going into 2016, i don't think that was accomplished. rand paul did what he was supposed to do, it will make his base happy. it will not sway any votes. if i saw correctly, 37% of republicans approve of her. for her, that is not terrible. i mean, she has always been a pretty polarizing figure. she is leaving state departmen
of transition for american foreign policy as senator john kerry faces a high-stakes job interview to be the secretary of state. kerry's confirmation hearings were rather cordial hosted by the foreign relations committee which he's led for the past four years. but it was an unexpected moment when the hearings were interrupted by a protester that offered perhaps the most telling revelation about the man and the moment. >> i'm tired of my friends dying. i don't know if they're going to be alive the next day. >> when i first came to washington and testified, i obviously was testifying as part of a group of people who came here to have their voices heard, and that is, above all, what this place is about. people measure what we do. >> kerry's confirmation hearing today comes a day after secretary hillary clinton stood her ground offering a robust defense of her handling of those attacks in benghazi that killed four americans, including ambassador chris stevens. at wednesday's long-awaited hearings on benghazi, clinton took responsibility for security lapses but that obviously was not go
detachment has been his foreign policy hallmark. "economy" writes that a tone of cool detachment has been his forei foreign-policy hallmark. from being the "indispensable nation, "mr. preside nation, "so how do you see the nex they are a catalyst present but t four years? not deeply involved. just to start you out on the huge threat of an iranian nuclear weapon, how does that factor into the second term? >> i think it's possible that this year there may be an action by israel against iran. it looked likely last year. i thought it was going to happen. and then it looked less likely. and people i'm speaking to think it is once again a possibility. that changes the entire dynamic. and this administration talks about wanting to shift to asia. sure, that sounds greatest. but i think it will be very difficult to do. especially in that happens. if the israelis decide after their elections that they are moving a little bit more to the right, if the iranian elections coming up bring that country even further to the right, it seems like some sort of clash is coming. that's just on the israel-iran. if y
this at all, richard, to discredit the president on foreign policy? >> i have to say that i think that benghazi is largely a function of people who suffer from obama-derangement syndrome, because i think that people who are kind of looking at the facts, does this trace to the white house, and does it trace to the president or the secretary of the state, and i h think that every bit of information that we have so far the answer to all of the questions so far is no. might they keep hammering it? of course, but at the end of the day, i don't believe we will look back in the second term and said, man, they should have gotten that benghazi behind them, because they have. >> and do you think that we will be talking about benghazi coming up? >> we, the facts and the more that the white house and the administration says this happened and by the way, that happened and not just from the partisan perspective, but coming from the state department and so forth, and with all respect, it is the senate role to ask the tough questions and the question is whether or not it is a legitimate con ver
the latest details and take a look at the latest front in the growing list of u.s. foreign policy challenges when nbc news foreign correspondent amman joins us on set coming up next. [ male announcer ] where do you turn for legal matters? maybe you want to incorporate a business. or protect your family with a will or living trust. and you'd like the help of an attorney. at legalzoom a legal plan attorney is available in most states with every personalized document to answer questions. get started at legalzoom.com today. and now you're protected. >>> the white house is currently monitoring a kidnapping situation. approximately 44 nationals, including an unconfirmed number of americans, were kidnapped wednesday by an al qaeda linked group in retaliation for french air strikes against rebel forces in neighboring mali. speaking from the white house podium this hour white house press secretary jay carney, confirmed that u.s. citizens are involved and said president obama was being briefed regularly on the ongoing situation. he would not address media reports that a rescue attempt by the algerian
foreign policy posts, we can be sure that vietnam will continue to lurk in the foreign policy apparatus. you'd think we couldn't learn more of what happened in vietnam given the books and movies telling the tales but you would be wrong. one day, one graduate student researching post traumatic stress disorder searched through secret pentagon archives and interviewing vets and reading journals to uncover the story of american atrocities in vietnam. in a war where we killed more than 2 million civilians. the result is a book called "kill anything that moves" where he says the stunning scale of civilian suffering far beyond the result of bad apples but the policy. serious accusations of nick turs joining us now. i want to warn the viewers some of the images in this segment might be disturbing. but nick, the most important question, what is the value to america in unearthing this now and talking to americans about the things, the atrocities that happened in vietnam at american hands? >> well, thanks for having me on. i think it's incumbent on americans to know exactly what war is about, espe
of fundamental issues for a president, guns and keeping the government going and fighting for his foreign policy team. it's not like he's looked for a fight. let's face it, newtown forced everybody to deal with this. >> newtown has changed everything. >> i don't think he's looking for a fight. i think he's found one. >> i agree with you. i think since the election this has been the best period the president has had in the last four years. a lot of things have come together for him. he's in sync with the country, and the country is in sync for him. the question for the gop, are you prepared for this barack obama? you didn't seem to be able to handle the first one. are you prepared for this one who now has the kind of wind in his sails going into a second term that can be very, very good for him in terms of at least in the first six or so months laying down some hard lines for the gop to cross. i think they can, but they're going to have to make the argument, you know, from a principled position, get off the crazy noise we have -- >> don't they have -- >> distract -- >> on an issue we just talked
and their second terms end up focusing on foreign policy, maybe more than they intend to, maybe more than their first terms. why is that? >> the main reason probably is when a president comes in for a second term, he usually has about six to eight months to get things through congress. it may seem small, but even lbj in '65, with 61% presidential landslide, more democrats 234 congress than any other time in the 20th scentry except for roosevelt, he knew enough about the senate and the house, he said i've got six months because i'm going to be asking democrats and some republicans to cast some risky votes. after a while, they're going to start rebelling because they're going to look to the election ne next year. foreign policy is something you can do without running to congress for permission ever day. >> ah. it's the can when you can't do other things. >> indeed. >> they're always from history. in terms of the president looking ahead at six to eight months, what they're telegraphing right now from the white house is that the heavy lift they're going to ask for is a variety of measures rel
of experiences. both in foreign policy and on the crime bill, the '94 crime bill is something he shepherded and his extraordinary ability to deal with senate republicans in a way a lot of people can't. senator reed and mitch mcconnell don't get along that well so i don't read nieg into it other than the president has an eset in the vice president and he's using that asset and he's deploying him well. the thing we should be mindful of is that there's over the next four years there's going to be a lot of tea leaf reading but at the end of the day, you know, the president is using the personing that get a job done and he's done an extraordinary job so far. let me say, passing this legislation will be tough. it's important to put your best feet on the ground there because it's really not -- it's going to be tough to get these bills passed. >> and it's not just ability. the vice president -- and again i worked closely with him for a few years -- he really likes this kind of political dealmaking in a way i don't think the president likes that much. if he's pushed to it he can do it. but the vice
and construct this bipartisan foreign policy that's been the tradition in this country and helped us win the cold war. >> senator barbara boxer. we were all so young. only so few years ago. senator, thanks very much for joining us. >>ates flashback. interestingly, have you now spoken with senator hagel, former senator hagel, and you have decided that you will support him. tell me what did he say that persuaded you that this was not just a convergence of -- conversion of convenience? that he is really committed to your value system going forward. >> not just did i speak with him at length, but i asked him to put in writing his positions on the various issues of concern to me, which included the issue of sanctions against iran, our relationship with our great ally israel, which included his attitude toward gays in the military, which included his attitude towards making sure that women in the military are protected from rape m military and, many of the, have the same reproductive health care as women outside the military. this wasn't one question. it was a series of questions. i will say a
've been an outstanding secretary of state, an exemplary representative of american foreign policy and american values and interest to every leader around the world. you have changed the face of america abroad and extended the hospitable reach of our nation to ordinary citizens, in addition to world leaders. during your tenure, you have steered us through economic crisis in europe, changing relations with asia, regime change in the arab world, a momentous transition in libya, and a trend towards global strength based on economics rather than arms. in addition to these priorities, on nearly every trip of which you are the most traveled secretary in history, you also supported, met, and provided a voice to those individuals that don't live in the limelight. women, children, the lbgt community, made a real personal difference in the live of so many people, and for that you have the thanks of a grateful nation. i know you will not go gently from the world stage and i look forward to working closely to you in the future. we thank you for your service here in the senate and as secretary
choice to carry forward the obama administration's foreign policy, and i urge his speedy confirmation. >> and at her side one of her toughest critics on benghazi. today recounting how he and fellow vietnam veteran john kerry worked together to normalize relations with vietnam in the 1990s. >> helping to establish a relationship with vietnam that serves american interests and values rather than one that remained meyered many mutual resentment and bitterness is one of my proudest accomplishments as a senator. i expect it is one of john's as well. witnessing almost daily his exetch lear statesmanship is one of the highest privileges i've had here. >> kerry's first appearance on the senate foreign relations panel as an activist. some things don't change. >> how do you ask a man to be the last man to die in vietnam? >> i'm tired of -- >> when i first came to washington and testified, i was testifying as part of the group of people who came here to have their voices heard, and that is, above all, what this place is about, so i respect, i think, the woman who was voicing her concerns about t
the neoconservative phase of the republican party as far as foreign policy goes. most republicans in the senate and the house, like the american people, are exhausted by 10, 11, 12 years of war. obviously, john mccain and lindsey graham are on the forefront and have shaped republican foreign policy for a few years. certainly john mccain has. he is in a shrinking minority. and it's shrinking very quickly. and i suspect you're going to see a return to the realism of colin powell of dr. brzezinski, of brent scowcroft, of george h.w. bush, of the republicans who helped us and democrats who helped us through that approach when the cold war. >> and this is the post-superpower era, where there has to be some pulling back, and david said it exactly right. >> i wouldn't say post-superpower. you're right, it's a new era. it's much more indirection in our application of power. the neocons are for direct use of power. this will have to be more indirect. >> and there may be surprises there, as always is the case. look at what happened with algeria and mali. >> dr. zbigniew brzezinski, dad, thanks for not wa
's more into foreign policy. >> eleanor, i'm curious how much you think approval ratings matter in a second term. you are not running for office again, but let's face it, popularity will also potentially equate with political capital. >> well, that's right. popularity equates with how much you can get done on capitol hill. i heard you say that bill clinton was one of two president who is rose in popularity second term nap's despite he was impeached. >> small detail. >> he was able to cash in on that because he pitted the american people against the congress. that's the opening this president has. i'm heartened by the fact they'll take organizing for america and make it organizing advocacy. i don't know why they didn't do that in the first term. i'm pretty optimistic about what he can get done. we've seen transformation in american society with the acceptance of gay marriage, transformation in the media. there could be transformations on capitol hill. if the president isn't able to accomplish, for example, his gun control agenda, who's going to look bad on that? that could have r
first four years, the person who probably had the most influence on my foreign policy was woman. the people who were in charge of moving forward my most important domestic initiative, health care, were women. the person in charge of our homeland security was woman. my two appointments to the supreme court were women. and 50% of my white house staff were women. so i think people should expect that that record will be built upon during the next four years. >> well, is the criticism fair against the president that's been thrown at him? falling short of his problem of being a champion for women. howard fineman is an msnbc political analyst. and "huffington post" has been facing obama. the road forward. and dee dee meyers. you were kind of a pioneeress in all this. i watch this. and maybe there's tokenism. which is maybe better than nothing. you wonder about the decision how they made it to make it look good. what's better to make it look bad by not doing it or to look good when you don't intend to have that person in there? >> the best is to put people in with the best authority and
. and i think that's really what he wants to do with the foreign policy is to move it in a new direction. >> it means he's going back to cairo. the speech he gave in june, 200 9d, he's going back to cairo. >> let's talk about that. let me talk about this. i think what i'm hearing from robin right, some real experts in the middle east. we may not be able to, but if we can, and they do proceed on it and once we attack them, we will never be able to talk them out of it. they will go back and do it again and again and again. if we go to war with them, it will be an unending struggle. we have a little time to talk them out of it. and i think that's what he's trying to send, this big message. to say you know what, i don't think cheney wanted peace. i think he wanted a war. but maybe this guy will give us something? that puts us in a position where we can say yes, we're not going to go nuclear. we're not going to do it. that's what they want. they want trade. they want economic opportunity. maybe they want to join the world. >> and the thing is, he's backed up these words by picking chuck hagel
on the bigger issues of foreign policy. ultimately the security of our diplomats depens on the host country. this is all a discussion about there might have been five security people on the ground if only there was more funning and deployment and that cable and this cable, there would have been eight or nine that might have led to more protection or more casualties. here in washington the decision was made to provide well more than 16 security people to libya. nobody that i know of in washington was involved in the issue of how many of those were in benghazi going with the ambassador or there in advance. the decision that all 16 weren't with him was a decision that you can't blame either political party or anyone in washington for. ultimately all we can have is enough to stave off a militant attack for a few hours and after that if the host country doesn't come to the rescue, it doesn't matter whether we have 3, 6, 12, 16, or 36 armed guards and marines at the location. one aspect of protecting our diplomats in the future is bringing to justice the criminal who is did this this time. we did
that existed in june of 2006 is considered success. and it is not. this continues to be a terrible foreign policy mistake. and now we are confronted with the question, how do we clean up the mess. >> senator obama knew he needed to have a presidential level of credibility in such hearings. republican senator marco rubio has been talking tough about benghazi for months. >> one of the narratives that the obama campaign has laid out, osama bin laden is dead, they e retreated. you start to say do they allow any story to emerge that counters that narrative. is that why they told us that benghazi was a popular uprising, because it ran counter to their campaign narrative. >> and so the pressure was on senator rubio to deliver to all his fans all the fire and brim stone they had a right to expect. he was not just facing the secretary of state, who took responsibility for what happened in benghazi. he was facing possibly the next democratic nominee for president. tonight, the marco rubio fans could not be more disappointed. >> one of the things that i'm more interested in exploring to you, how inf
're also entering into a new age of some beg decision in foreign policy because this country right now is starting to get some adversaries around the world because of our drone policy. that was not the situation four years ago. so this is -- our foreign policy is going to be judged on just how aggressive we get with that, and there's a growing concern in the community across the country about the drone attacks. just how many innocent people are we killing? there's been concerted conversation about we have to reel this in, and president obama, i think, is going to hear a great deal about that when it comes to foreign policy coming up here in the coming months. just how aggressive are we going to get? >> that specific reference that we should not be in a state of perpetual war. >> we are, and it's a different kind of war. >> i mean, that's the -- legally that's the justification that they cite for saying why it is that we can kill people in places where we're technically not waging some sort of war. that there is a global war still underway, and the authorization of using military force
think there was a pretty strong sense today that not just on domestic policy, but even on some foreign policy, he moved. sometimes the criticism was he kept a little too much of bush, this was a breaking point. a lot of what lingered, some of the people, some of the policies seem to be pushed back now. >> was this the speech that liberals have been waiting for? >> sure it was. >> and now is it the foundation for the next several years? >> well, barack obama is a complicated man. we have to be honest about him. >> he is a deal maker. >> yeah, he is. and he is also a mediator. he really does believe in trying to bring people together. so we can't tell ourselves that he is going to give us everything we want. but what i thought from this speech was that he was saying, look, i know where you're at, the people who elected me. i know the coalition that elected me. if you keep the noise up, if you keep talking about this, i'll take care of you. i will watch for you. and he wasn't tossing them all under the bus. this was not a hey, i know you elected me, but now i can't do much for you. >> was
and wilson foreign policy definition. could you talk about those two presidents and how they defined what we now think of as the job of the president. >> lincoln was a strong president who exerted executive power. what you have is the assumption was that congress would govern and every once in a while you'd have a strong president. andrew jackson or abraham lincoln. in the 20th century, teddy roosevelt changes that. at one point roosevelt is pushing through some piece of legislation and people were telling him he can't do it, and he gets out a copy of the constitution and he holds up article ii and he says show me here why i can't do this. i think that become the assumption of presidents in the 20th century. if quur you're not specifically prevented from doing it, you can do it. wilson builds on the power of the president, the precedent that teddy roosevelt established. it's franklin roosevelt and the experience during world war ii that really changes the nature of the office and it's the cold war. the greatest expansion in presidential power throughout our history has taken place during tim
all americans are prepared for a 21st century work force. talk to us about foreign policy, democracy in the middle east. i think we want to hear it all. >> so your message, he wants us to say, hey. you're naive. >> yes. >> that was a naive speech. >> yes. >> i agree. >> i don't think he cares what we say. >> that's right. >> but i think he cares what others think and i think he needs to be able to project that message of hope to voters without them tuning out and saying, yeah. yada, yada. i've heard that. don't remind me. >> pragmatic. >> in fact we could take the hope stickers from the last election and just add pragmatic on to that. >> pragmatic hope. >> i think that would be it. >> all right. stick around. i want to talk a little about what the democratic party is up to and what obama for america or whatever we are supposed to call it now organizing for action. trivia we asked how many times has the winning super bowl team hailed from the same state as the president during his inauguration year? all right. the answer is three. i only got two. here is missed, nixon was inaugurated
of how progressive this message was is the foreign policy piece. advocating for engagement against the backdrop of a hostage situation in algeria is a very firm flag to plant in the ground. to say that as we see al qaeda cells multiplying, taking over a host of failed states in north africa and now west africa. to say these are not our enemies, that we can come in peace, that we can have peaceable relations with evil actors in the world is very much obama 1.0. for him to say that now i thought was really, really remarkable if you're talking about hawk versus dove, progressive versus conservative. >> i thought that was a direct message to the mullahs and to the people of iran. i spent some time with one family this week. i think he knows that the worst case scenario is war, it always is the worst case scenario and he's hoping somehow we can stop them from weaponizing. >> but chris -- >> nuclear weapons. >> i think this was a forthrightly liberal speech. i think that -- >> you're an eight. >> he said we are a country that doesn't -- that believes that every citizen deserves a decent
some key lines that might be a sign of what's to come in his second term foreign policy. let's listen to a bit of what the president said yesterday. >> we, the people, still believe that enduring security and lasting peace do not require perpetual war. our citizens seared by the memory of those we have lost know too well the price that is paid for liberty. the knowledge of their sacrifice will keep us forever vigilant against those who would do us harm, but we are also heirs to those who won the peace and not just the war, who turned sworn enemies into the surest of friends, and we must carry those lessons into this time as well. we will show the courage to try and resolve our differences with other nations peacefully, not because we are naive about the dangers we face, but because engagement can more durably lift suspicion and fear. >> that's what i like about president obama and one of the many reasons i like him, because of that. could that be an olive branch the president might extend to nations such as, let's say it, iran, and if so, will they respond in tehran? richard engel is
africa. this is going to be a large foreign policy problem, national security issue, for the administration going forward and there will be a lot >> we're expected o foll -pay provision to the bill, which would withhold lawmakers' paychecks if they failed to pass a budget and attempt to embarrass the senate and refocus thfit wi >>> this bill is a political gimmick. this bill was cooked up a few miles from here, when, frankly, the majority party said, we're in trouble, the people don't like us, things aren't going well, how do we fix it? well, they came up with this gimmick. >> well, that was thousands democratic whip, steny hoyer, hitting republicans on the no budget, no pay deal passed wednesday. after a bruising election, a tough fight on the fiscal cliff, and with even more fiscal deadlines looming, can republicans regroup? joining me now, republican tom price, vice chair of the budget committee and on the front lines of this battle. congressman price, apologies for my voice. i'll try to keep my questions short. >> nice hearing your voice today, chuck, so good hea
is the whole point about this and informs the foreign policy and the difference maybe why a filmmaker is currently in jail and we agreed that the moment was sort of like a rorschach test. if you like her, that's a great victory. maybe if you don't you saw that as pretty damaging. what are you hearing on the hill from democrats and republicans about that particular moment and any sort of long lasting affects it might have? >> well, clearly, that was the one moment the republicans jumped on to say, look, this is the problem. the problem is that the administration didn't call it an act of terrorism. right off the bat. there was a story trotted out about a spontaneous demonstration and this growing out of this demonstration and that's the point of republicans all along. the administration misled the public n. this case, you have the secretary of state saying what's the difference between the two things and made them even angrier. however, secretary clinton opposed to other officials is saying that from a point where she had originally come out and said this was an attack by armed militant
administration's foreign policy. >> secretary clinton introducing senator john kerry at the confirmation hearing. we'll have the latest on what she said and what senator -- they have in common and not in a good way. we'll talk about what's next for secretary clinton as well as senator kerry and be sure to check out the "news nation tumblr page. at optionsxpress we're all about options trading. we create easy to use, powerful trading tools for all. look at these streaming charts! they're totally customizable and they let you visualize what might happen next. that's genius! strategies, chains, positions. we put 'em all on one screen! could we make placing a trade any easier? mmmm...could we? open an account today and get a free 13-month e ibd™ subscription when you call 1-888-280-0157 now. optionsxpress by charles schwab. marie callender's turkey breast with stuffing is a great reason to slow down. creamy mash potatoes, homestyle gravy and 320 calories. marie callender's. it's time to savor. and 320 calories. with tasty grilled flavor and goodness to savor ♪ ♪ friskies grillers blend. ♪ fe
on guns and foreign policy, how can you call that the far left? >> let me put it this way, the fact of the matter is this is going to be politically very problematic for harry reid because for the constituency he represents in the senate, they're not going to be able to get a lot of things that the president wants done because it's too far to the left of him. for example, on gun control, that's going to be very problematic for -- >> can i get back to shrummy? does it bother you your opinions are generally acceptable or do you prefer to be a maverick? >> i've been waiting for the country to come around. i thought it would. i think barack obama has done a brilliant job. i would say to john he keeps talking about the problems in the red states. the red states are becoming a shrinking part of america. the one thing boehner said that is true is the republican party is annihilating itself in terms of being able to win the presidency. because they are in a demographic death spiral with women, with hispanics, with african-americans, with young people, with gays. what happened with ronald re
the president issued a memorandum instructing more engagement in foreign policy around lgbt people. this is having humongous impact. >> humongous impact. >> all over the world and real life saving important things. we need that engagement to continue. >> yeah. >> we need all the work that's going on around health care, which is so important to all americans. you know, the medicaid expansion thing that we talk about a lot in terms of other populations for transgender people it is hugely important. so many of us have been impover shed. >> many americans aren't aware of it. they understand we have a set of protections on if you are a woman, a set of protections on your religion. i don't think many people realize in this country, if you are a transgender woman or a transgender man or gay or lesbian, you can lose your job in many states in this country. >> there's been legislation on it since 1974. it's been discussed in congress. we do not have this. it's something the president can put his weight behind and push for as well. there's something else i want to mention. california passed
internally in this white house. and that in all likelihood some kind of foreign policy controversy will take over and dominate the second term like happens in most second terms. and he's very well versed in those areas. >> kelly, dennis mcdonough is probably known to most americans for his involvement on foreign policy, the raid to get osama bin laden, the surge in afghanistan. what about his relationship, though, with congress which will be more important now? >> reporter: well, when you're in a chief of staff position, you're the ultimate gatekeeper. and so a relationship with congress can center on a couple things. we saw bill daly when he was serving the president, had a different kind of style, that didn't have a lot of interaction with congress. rahm emanuel who had been of congress, a real understanding of how the body works. and to it will be interesting to see, especially because so much of that chief of staff role is about sort of the domestic playing field, how he will bring his skill set. so it's really about management. it's really about trying to keep the president on task and
foreign policy of the united states. the united states engages in so many activities without thinking through the consequences, and the nato attack on libya, the hijacking of the libyan uprising has led to the flooding of northwest africa with weapons that is now out of control. the uprising, and the subsequent uprising in mali which has now been taken over by the al qaeda in the iz lslamic maghreb and further activities of the kidnappings are all of the direct consequences of an action that in my opinion, the united states should never have en gamged in. >> i would say as we watch that we will cover this in the future as we watch the french intervention in mali, the u.s. is not alone in engaging in ad hoc french policy, and some of the french citizens are asking themselves questions about that, donna. >> well, switching subjects, i think that we now know that the president is willing to go big, and we saw it in the statement that he made about what is going to be done on guns. both the 23 executive orders that he signed, but as well as saying to the congress, we have to have an assau
. and three, coming back to the president's speech, it indicates that foreign policy is not going to go away as an issue for the white house. and one interesting factoid is when they went into iraq, they made senior officials sit down and watch the battle of algiers back in 1957 because that was the prototype of how to get it wrong in terms of trying to suppress extremists in armed conflict. and essentially the echoes of that original algerian war are still reverberating even today. and not even the white house can escape them. >> what's that movie called? >> al qaeda is today a franchise operation. >>> up next, whole foods' ceo john mackey is here with his new book that puts a new spin on capitalism. we're going to be back in a minute. (announcer) make mornings special, with fancy feast mornings gourmet cat food. mornings are delicious protein rich entrees with garden veggies and egg. fancy feast mornings. the best ingredient is love. nothing. are you stealing our daughter's school supplies and taking them to work? no, i was just looking for my stapler and my... this thing. i save money by
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 53 (some duplicates have been removed)